Malignant tumors have affected the human being since the pharaoh period, but in the last century the incidence of this disease has increased due to a large number of risk factors, including deleterious lifestyle habits (i.e., smoking) and the higher longevity. Many efforts have been spent in the last decades on achieving an early stage diagnosis of cancer, and more effective cures, leading to a decline in age-standardized cancer mortality rates. In the last years, our research groups have developed new metal-based complexes, with the aim to obtain a better selectivity for cancer cells and less side effects than the clinically established reference drug cisplatin. This work is focused on four novel Au(III) and Ru(III) complexes that share the piperidine dithiocarbamato (pipe-DTC) as the ligand, in a different molar ratio. The compounds [AuCl2(pipeDTC)], [Au(pipeDTC)2]Cl, [Ru(pipeDTC)3] and β-[Ru2(pipeDTC)5] have been synthesized and fully characterized by several chemical analyses. We have then investigated their biological properties in two different cell lines, namely, AGS (gastric adenocarcinoma) and HCT116 (colon carcinomas), showing significant differences among the four compounds. First, the two gold-based compounds and β-[Ru2(pipeDTC)5] display IC50 in the µM range, significantly lower than cisplatin. Second, we showed that [AuCl2(pipeDTC)] and β-[Ru2(pipeDTC)5]Cl drive different molecular mechanisms. The first was able to induce the protein level of the DNA damage response factor p53 and the autophagy protein p62, in contrast to the second that induced the ATF4 protein level, but repressed p62 expression. This study highlights that the biological activity of different complexes bringing the same organic ligand depends on the electronic and structural properties of the metal, which are able to fine tune the biological properties, giving us precious information that can help to design more selective anticancer drugs.

Gold(III) to Ruthenium(III) Metal Exchange in Dithiocarbamato Complexes Tunes Their Biological Mode of Action for Cytotoxicity in Cancer Cells

Chiara Nardon;
2021-01-01

Abstract

Malignant tumors have affected the human being since the pharaoh period, but in the last century the incidence of this disease has increased due to a large number of risk factors, including deleterious lifestyle habits (i.e., smoking) and the higher longevity. Many efforts have been spent in the last decades on achieving an early stage diagnosis of cancer, and more effective cures, leading to a decline in age-standardized cancer mortality rates. In the last years, our research groups have developed new metal-based complexes, with the aim to obtain a better selectivity for cancer cells and less side effects than the clinically established reference drug cisplatin. This work is focused on four novel Au(III) and Ru(III) complexes that share the piperidine dithiocarbamato (pipe-DTC) as the ligand, in a different molar ratio. The compounds [AuCl2(pipeDTC)], [Au(pipeDTC)2]Cl, [Ru(pipeDTC)3] and β-[Ru2(pipeDTC)5] have been synthesized and fully characterized by several chemical analyses. We have then investigated their biological properties in two different cell lines, namely, AGS (gastric adenocarcinoma) and HCT116 (colon carcinomas), showing significant differences among the four compounds. First, the two gold-based compounds and β-[Ru2(pipeDTC)5] display IC50 in the µM range, significantly lower than cisplatin. Second, we showed that [AuCl2(pipeDTC)] and β-[Ru2(pipeDTC)5]Cl drive different molecular mechanisms. The first was able to induce the protein level of the DNA damage response factor p53 and the autophagy protein p62, in contrast to the second that induced the ATF4 protein level, but repressed p62 expression. This study highlights that the biological activity of different complexes bringing the same organic ligand depends on the electronic and structural properties of the metal, which are able to fine tune the biological properties, giving us precious information that can help to design more selective anticancer drugs.
gastric cancer; metal complexes; chemotherapy; dithiocarbamates; drug mechanism of action; ER stress; p53; autophagy
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1060277
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