Background & aims: Variations in gut microbiota might impact metabolism leading to body weight excess. We assessed the impact of a probiotic supplementation in pediatric obesity on weight, metabolic alterations, selected gut microbial groups, and functionality.Methods: Cross-over, double-blind, randomized control trial (BIFI-OBESE trial; NCT03261466). 101 youths (6-18 years, Tanner stage >= 2) with obesity and insulin-resistance on diet were randomized to 2 x 10(9) CFU/AFU/day of Bifidobacterium breve BR03 (DSM 16604) and B. breve B632 (DSM 24706) (51) or placebo (50) for 8 weeks with a 4-weeks wash-out period.Results: All subjects (M/F 54/47) completed the first 8 weeks, and 82 (M/F 43/39) the last part without adverse events. Mixed-effects models revealed a carry-over effect on many variables in the entire study, narrowing the analysis to the first 8 weeks before the wash-out periods. All subjects improved metabolic parameters, and decreased weight and Escherichia coli counts. Probiotics improved insulin sensitivity at fasting (QUICKI, 0.013 CI95%0.0-0.03) and during OGTT (ISI, 0.654 CI95%-0.11-1.41). Cytokines, GLP1, and target microbial counts did not vary. Of 25 SCFAs, acetic acid and acetic acid pentyl-ester relative abundance remained stable in the probiotics, while increased in the placebo (p < 0.02). A signature of five butanoic esters identified three clusters, one of them had better glucose responses during probiotics.Conclusion: An 8 weeks treatment with B. breve BR03 and B632 had beneficial effects on insulin sensitivity in youths with obesity. Microbiota functionality could influence metabolic answers to probiotics. Long-term studies to confirm and enrich our findings are justified. Tailored probiotic treatments could be an additional strategy for obesity. (C) 2021 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.

Supplementation with Bifidobacterium breve BR03 and B632 strains improved insulin sensitivity in children and adolescents with obesity in a cross-over, randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial

Calgaro, Matteo;Vitulo, Nicola;
2021

Abstract

Background & aims: Variations in gut microbiota might impact metabolism leading to body weight excess. We assessed the impact of a probiotic supplementation in pediatric obesity on weight, metabolic alterations, selected gut microbial groups, and functionality.Methods: Cross-over, double-blind, randomized control trial (BIFI-OBESE trial; NCT03261466). 101 youths (6-18 years, Tanner stage >= 2) with obesity and insulin-resistance on diet were randomized to 2 x 10(9) CFU/AFU/day of Bifidobacterium breve BR03 (DSM 16604) and B. breve B632 (DSM 24706) (51) or placebo (50) for 8 weeks with a 4-weeks wash-out period.Results: All subjects (M/F 54/47) completed the first 8 weeks, and 82 (M/F 43/39) the last part without adverse events. Mixed-effects models revealed a carry-over effect on many variables in the entire study, narrowing the analysis to the first 8 weeks before the wash-out periods. All subjects improved metabolic parameters, and decreased weight and Escherichia coli counts. Probiotics improved insulin sensitivity at fasting (QUICKI, 0.013 CI95%0.0-0.03) and during OGTT (ISI, 0.654 CI95%-0.11-1.41). Cytokines, GLP1, and target microbial counts did not vary. Of 25 SCFAs, acetic acid and acetic acid pentyl-ester relative abundance remained stable in the probiotics, while increased in the placebo (p < 0.02). A signature of five butanoic esters identified three clusters, one of them had better glucose responses during probiotics.Conclusion: An 8 weeks treatment with B. breve BR03 and B632 had beneficial effects on insulin sensitivity in youths with obesity. Microbiota functionality could influence metabolic answers to probiotics. Long-term studies to confirm and enrich our findings are justified. Tailored probiotic treatments could be an additional strategy for obesity. (C) 2021 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.
Insulin sensitivity
Microbiota
Pediatric obesity
Probiotics
Adolescent
Child
Cross-Over Studies
Double-Blind Method
Female
Gastrointestinal Microbiome
Humans
Insulin
Male
Pediatric Obesity
Probiotics
Treatment Outcome
Bifidobacterium breve
Insulin Resistance
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11562/1060201
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