The living cell possesses extraordinary molecular and biochemical mechanisms by which to recognize and efficiently remove foreign, damaged, or denatured proteins. This essential function has been a barrier to the overexpression of recombinant proteins in most expression systems. A notable exception is the overexpression in E. coli of recombinant proteins, most of which, however, end-up as "inclusion bodies", i.e., cytoplasmic aggregates of proteins that are inaccessible to the cell's proteasome. "Fusion constructs as protein overexpression vectors" proved to be unparalleled in their ability to cause substantial accumulation of recombinant proteins from plants, animals, and bacteria, as soluble proteins in unicellular cyanobacteria. Recombinant protein levels in the range of 10-20% of the total cellular protein can be achieved. The present work investigated this unique property in the context of recombinant protein stability in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 by developing and applying an in vivo cellular tobacco etch virus cleavage system with the objective of separating the target heterologous proteins from their fusion leader sequences. The work provides new insights about the overexpression, cellular stability, and exploitation of transgenes with commercial interest, highly expressed in a cyanobacterial biofactory. The results support the notion that eukaryotic plant- and animal-origin recombinant proteins are unstable, when free in the cyanobacterial cytosol but stable when in a fusion configuration with a highly expressed cyanobacterial native or heterologous protein. Included in this analysis are recombinant proteins of the plant isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway (isoprene synthase, beta-phellandrene synthase, geranyl diphosphate synthase), the human interferon protein, as well as prokaryotic proteins (tetanus toxin fragment C and the antibiotic resistance genes kanamycin and chloramphenicol). The future success of synthetic biology approaches with cyanobacteria and other systems would require overexpression of pathway enzymes to attain product volume, and the work reported in this paper sets the foundation for such recombinant pathway enzyme overexpression.

Recombinant Protein Stability in Cyanobacteria

Nico Betterle;
2021

Abstract

The living cell possesses extraordinary molecular and biochemical mechanisms by which to recognize and efficiently remove foreign, damaged, or denatured proteins. This essential function has been a barrier to the overexpression of recombinant proteins in most expression systems. A notable exception is the overexpression in E. coli of recombinant proteins, most of which, however, end-up as "inclusion bodies", i.e., cytoplasmic aggregates of proteins that are inaccessible to the cell's proteasome. "Fusion constructs as protein overexpression vectors" proved to be unparalleled in their ability to cause substantial accumulation of recombinant proteins from plants, animals, and bacteria, as soluble proteins in unicellular cyanobacteria. Recombinant protein levels in the range of 10-20% of the total cellular protein can be achieved. The present work investigated this unique property in the context of recombinant protein stability in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 by developing and applying an in vivo cellular tobacco etch virus cleavage system with the objective of separating the target heterologous proteins from their fusion leader sequences. The work provides new insights about the overexpression, cellular stability, and exploitation of transgenes with commercial interest, highly expressed in a cyanobacterial biofactory. The results support the notion that eukaryotic plant- and animal-origin recombinant proteins are unstable, when free in the cyanobacterial cytosol but stable when in a fusion configuration with a highly expressed cyanobacterial native or heterologous protein. Included in this analysis are recombinant proteins of the plant isoprenoid biosynthetic pathway (isoprene synthase, beta-phellandrene synthase, geranyl diphosphate synthase), the human interferon protein, as well as prokaryotic proteins (tetanus toxin fragment C and the antibiotic resistance genes kanamycin and chloramphenicol). The future success of synthetic biology approaches with cyanobacteria and other systems would require overexpression of pathway enzymes to attain product volume, and the work reported in this paper sets the foundation for such recombinant pathway enzyme overexpression.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11562/1059553
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