Capsaicin (CAP) activates the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel on sensory neurons, improving ATP production, vascular function, fatigue resistance, and thus exercise performance. However, the underlying mechanisms of CAP-induced ergogenic effects and fatigue-resistance, remain elusive. To evaluate the potential anti-fatigue effects of CAP, 10 young healthy males performed constant-load cycling exercise time to exhaustion (TTE) trials (85% maximal work rate) after ingestion of placebo (PL; fiber) or CAP capsules in a blinded, counterbalanced, crossover design, while cardiorespiratory responses were monitored. Fatigue was assessed with the interpolated twitch technique, pre-post exercise, during isometric maximal voluntary contractions (MVC). No significant differences (p > 0.05) were detected in cardiorespiratory responses and self-reported fatigue (RPE scale) during the time trial or in TTE (375 ± 26 and 327 ± 36 s, respectively). CAP attenuated the reduction in potentiated twitch (PL: -52 ± 6 vs. CAP: -42 ± 11%, p = 0.037), and tended to attenuate the decline in maximal relaxation rate (PL: -47 ± 33 vs. CAP: -29 ± 68%, p = 0.057), but not maximal rate of force development, MVC, or voluntary muscle activation. Thus, CAP might attenuate neuromuscular fatigue through alterations in afferent signaling or neuromuscular relaxation kinetics, perhaps mediated via the sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase (SERCA) pumps, thereby increasing the rate of Ca2+ reuptake and relaxation.

Capsaicin and its effect on exercise performance, fatigue and inflammation after exercise

Giuriato, Gaia;Venturelli, Massimo;
2022

Abstract

Capsaicin (CAP) activates the transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channel on sensory neurons, improving ATP production, vascular function, fatigue resistance, and thus exercise performance. However, the underlying mechanisms of CAP-induced ergogenic effects and fatigue-resistance, remain elusive. To evaluate the potential anti-fatigue effects of CAP, 10 young healthy males performed constant-load cycling exercise time to exhaustion (TTE) trials (85% maximal work rate) after ingestion of placebo (PL; fiber) or CAP capsules in a blinded, counterbalanced, crossover design, while cardiorespiratory responses were monitored. Fatigue was assessed with the interpolated twitch technique, pre-post exercise, during isometric maximal voluntary contractions (MVC). No significant differences (p > 0.05) were detected in cardiorespiratory responses and self-reported fatigue (RPE scale) during the time trial or in TTE (375 ± 26 and 327 ± 36 s, respectively). CAP attenuated the reduction in potentiated twitch (PL: -52 ± 6 vs. CAP: -42 ± 11%, p = 0.037), and tended to attenuate the decline in maximal relaxation rate (PL: -47 ± 33 vs. CAP: -29 ± 68%, p = 0.057), but not maximal rate of force development, MVC, or voluntary muscle activation. Thus, CAP might attenuate neuromuscular fatigue through alterations in afferent signaling or neuromuscular relaxation kinetics, perhaps mediated via the sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase (SERCA) pumps, thereby increasing the rate of Ca2+ reuptake and relaxation.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11562/1056359
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