Objective To examine the association between the use of diabetes technology (insulin pump [CSII], glucose sensor [CGM] or both) and metabolic control (HbA1c) as well as body adiposity (BMI-SDS) over-time in a cohort of children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D), that have never used these technologies before. Subjects and methods Four thousand six hundred forty three T1D patients (2-18 years, T1D >= 1 year, without celiac disease, no CSII and/or CGM before 2016) participating in the SWEET prospective multicenter diabetes registry, were enrolled. Data were collected at two points (2016; 2019). Metabolic control was assessed by glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and body adiposity by BMI-SDS (WHO). Patients were categorized by treatment modality (multiple daily injections [MDI] or CSII) and the use or not of CGM. Linear regression models, adjusted for age, gender, duration of diabetes and region, were applied to assess differences in HbA1c and BMI-SDS among patient groups. Results The proportion of patients using MDI with CGM and CSII with CGM significantly increased from 2016 to 2019 (7.2%-25.7%, 7.8%-27.8% respectively; p < 0.001). Linear regression models showed a significantly lower HbA1c in groups that switched from MDI to CSII with or without CGM (p < 0.001), but a higher BMI-SDS (from MDI without CGM to CSII with CGM p < 0.05; from MDI without CGM to CSII without CGM p < 0.01). Conclusions Switching from MDI to CSII is significantly associated with improvement in glycemic control but increased BMI-SDS over-time. Diabetes technology may improve glucose control in youths with T1D although further strategies to prevent excess fat accumulation are needed.

Association of the use of diabetes technology with {HbA}1c and {BMI}-{SDS} in an international cohort of children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes: The {SWEET} project experience

Marco Marigliano
;
Claudio Maffeis
2021

Abstract

Objective To examine the association between the use of diabetes technology (insulin pump [CSII], glucose sensor [CGM] or both) and metabolic control (HbA1c) as well as body adiposity (BMI-SDS) over-time in a cohort of children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D), that have never used these technologies before. Subjects and methods Four thousand six hundred forty three T1D patients (2-18 years, T1D >= 1 year, without celiac disease, no CSII and/or CGM before 2016) participating in the SWEET prospective multicenter diabetes registry, were enrolled. Data were collected at two points (2016; 2019). Metabolic control was assessed by glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and body adiposity by BMI-SDS (WHO). Patients were categorized by treatment modality (multiple daily injections [MDI] or CSII) and the use or not of CGM. Linear regression models, adjusted for age, gender, duration of diabetes and region, were applied to assess differences in HbA1c and BMI-SDS among patient groups. Results The proportion of patients using MDI with CGM and CSII with CGM significantly increased from 2016 to 2019 (7.2%-25.7%, 7.8%-27.8% respectively; p < 0.001). Linear regression models showed a significantly lower HbA1c in groups that switched from MDI to CSII with or without CGM (p < 0.001), but a higher BMI-SDS (from MDI without CGM to CSII with CGM p < 0.05; from MDI without CGM to CSII without CGM p < 0.01). Conclusions Switching from MDI to CSII is significantly associated with improvement in glycemic control but increased BMI-SDS over-time. Diabetes technology may improve glucose control in youths with T1D although further strategies to prevent excess fat accumulation are needed.
HbA1c
children
glucose sensor
insulin pump
type 1 diabetes
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11562/1053953
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