Aim Transition from paediatric to adult care is a critical step in life of emerging adults with type 1 diabetes. We assessed, according to indicators established by panel of experts, clinical, socio-demographic and psychosocial factors in young adults with type 1 diabetes throughout structured transition to investigate the associations, if any, with HbA(1c) value at time of transition. Methods The "Verona Diabetes Transition Project" started in January 2009: a structured transition program, shared between paediatric and adult clinic, was organised with a multi-disciplinary team. All young adults underwent a semi-structured interview by a psychologist, before transition. Minimum age for transition was 18 years. Results 222 (M/F = 113/109) young adults moved to adult care from January 2009 to March 2020. The mean time between the last paediatric visit and the first adult visit ranged from 13.6 +/- 6.1 months at the beginning of the project to 3.6 +/- 11.5 months over the following years. At first adult clinic attendance, women showed higher HbA(1c) values (70 +/- 11 mmol/mol vs. 65 +/- 7 mmol/mol or 8.57% +/- 1.51% vs. 8.14% +/- 0.98%, p = 0.01), higher frequency of disorders of eating behaviours (15.6% vs. 0%, p < 0.001) and poor diabetes acceptance (23.9% vs. 9.7%, p < 0.001) than men. Mediation analyses showed a significant mediating role of glucose control 2 years before transition in the relationship between poor diabetes acceptance and glucose control at transition. Conclusions This study demonstrated a delay reduction in establishing care with an adult provider and suggested the potential role of low diabetes acceptance on glycemic control at transition. Further studies are needed to confirm and expand these data.

Growing up with type 1 diabetes mellitus: Data from the Verona Diabetes Transition Project

Pasquini, Silvia;Rinaldi, Elisabetta;Da Prato, Giuliana;Csermely, Alessandro;Indelicato, Liliana;Santi, Lorenza;Sabbion, Alberto;Maffeis, Claudio;Bonora, Enzo;Trombetta, Maddalena
2022

Abstract

Aim Transition from paediatric to adult care is a critical step in life of emerging adults with type 1 diabetes. We assessed, according to indicators established by panel of experts, clinical, socio-demographic and psychosocial factors in young adults with type 1 diabetes throughout structured transition to investigate the associations, if any, with HbA(1c) value at time of transition. Methods The "Verona Diabetes Transition Project" started in January 2009: a structured transition program, shared between paediatric and adult clinic, was organised with a multi-disciplinary team. All young adults underwent a semi-structured interview by a psychologist, before transition. Minimum age for transition was 18 years. Results 222 (M/F = 113/109) young adults moved to adult care from January 2009 to March 2020. The mean time between the last paediatric visit and the first adult visit ranged from 13.6 +/- 6.1 months at the beginning of the project to 3.6 +/- 11.5 months over the following years. At first adult clinic attendance, women showed higher HbA(1c) values (70 +/- 11 mmol/mol vs. 65 +/- 7 mmol/mol or 8.57% +/- 1.51% vs. 8.14% +/- 0.98%, p = 0.01), higher frequency of disorders of eating behaviours (15.6% vs. 0%, p < 0.001) and poor diabetes acceptance (23.9% vs. 9.7%, p < 0.001) than men. Mediation analyses showed a significant mediating role of glucose control 2 years before transition in the relationship between poor diabetes acceptance and glucose control at transition. Conclusions This study demonstrated a delay reduction in establishing care with an adult provider and suggested the potential role of low diabetes acceptance on glycemic control at transition. Further studies are needed to confirm and expand these data.
acceptance of disease and psychological issues; emerging adults; glucose control; transition; type 1 diabetes mellitus;
acceptance of disease and psychological issues
glucose control
transition from paediatric to adult care
type 1 diabetes mellitus
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11562/1052984
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