The main objective of this work was to develop a mechanistic understanding of how parent material and plant cultivar interactively control soil organic matter (SOM) accumulation and stabilization in vineyard agroecosystems. The main hypothesis is that parent material strongly impacts SOM stabilization through its control on (bio)geochemistry and nutrient supply. To test such a hypothesis, three experimental vineyards located in the Valpolicella area (Veneto region, North of Italy) were investigated. These sites were very close each other (max 300 m far away) and, consequently, characterized by the same climatic conditions; at the same time, the corresponding soils developed from completely different parent material (volcanic vs. calcareous). Two autochthonous grapevine cultivars (Vitis vinifera L. cv Corvina and V. vinifera cv Rondinella) planted in 2003 and grown in organic system (no fertilization) were selected in all sites, and the corresponding soils sampled in triplicate with a 10-cm depth resolution. An uncultivated soil profile for each site was included in this study and used as a control (5-cm resolution). Soil samples (n. 88) were characterized for pH, electrical conductivity, bulk density, total organic C, total N (TN), texture and major and trace elements. Moreover, particulate organic matter (POM) and mineral associated organic matter (MAOM) fractions were isolated using a physical fractionation method and will be characterized by elemental analysis (CHNS) and thermal stability (TGA-DSC). The 3 control soils showed a different stock of both organic C, ranging from 27 (volcanic soil) to 94 t/ha (calcareous soil), and TN, ranging from 2 (volcanic soil) to 9 t/ha (calcareous soil). The cultivation of grapevine affected soil organic C (SOC) and TN accumulation. In particular, an increase (1.5×) of both SOC and TN in the top 30 cm of soil was observed in 2 out of 3 sites, while an opposite trend (0.7×) was recorded in one site. Preliminary data suggest that SOM accumulation is promoted especially in vineyards showing a lower SOC content, and that the cultivar factor did not significantly affect SOC and TN stocks.

Soil organic matter accumulation in vineyard agroecosystems from the Valpolicella area

Galluzzi G.;Giannetta B.;Zaccone C.
2021

Abstract

The main objective of this work was to develop a mechanistic understanding of how parent material and plant cultivar interactively control soil organic matter (SOM) accumulation and stabilization in vineyard agroecosystems. The main hypothesis is that parent material strongly impacts SOM stabilization through its control on (bio)geochemistry and nutrient supply. To test such a hypothesis, three experimental vineyards located in the Valpolicella area (Veneto region, North of Italy) were investigated. These sites were very close each other (max 300 m far away) and, consequently, characterized by the same climatic conditions; at the same time, the corresponding soils developed from completely different parent material (volcanic vs. calcareous). Two autochthonous grapevine cultivars (Vitis vinifera L. cv Corvina and V. vinifera cv Rondinella) planted in 2003 and grown in organic system (no fertilization) were selected in all sites, and the corresponding soils sampled in triplicate with a 10-cm depth resolution. An uncultivated soil profile for each site was included in this study and used as a control (5-cm resolution). Soil samples (n. 88) were characterized for pH, electrical conductivity, bulk density, total organic C, total N (TN), texture and major and trace elements. Moreover, particulate organic matter (POM) and mineral associated organic matter (MAOM) fractions were isolated using a physical fractionation method and will be characterized by elemental analysis (CHNS) and thermal stability (TGA-DSC). The 3 control soils showed a different stock of both organic C, ranging from 27 (volcanic soil) to 94 t/ha (calcareous soil), and TN, ranging from 2 (volcanic soil) to 9 t/ha (calcareous soil). The cultivation of grapevine affected soil organic C (SOC) and TN accumulation. In particular, an increase (1.5×) of both SOC and TN in the top 30 cm of soil was observed in 2 out of 3 sites, while an opposite trend (0.7×) was recorded in one site. Preliminary data suggest that SOM accumulation is promoted especially in vineyards showing a lower SOC content, and that the cultivar factor did not significantly affect SOC and TN stocks.
Soil organic matter, C stock, physical fractionation, vineyard, Valpolicella
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11562/1049652
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