Objectives Dual-task (DT) performance is common to most activities of daily living and difficulties in DT activities may reduce quality of life in older adults. This study investigated the effect of DT training in a sample of older adults. Methods Sixty older adults (mean = 74.4 ± 3.1 years) participated in the study. Twenty-two older adults were included in the control (CG), 19 in the single-task (ST) training and 19 in DT training group. ST group received balance and walking training twice a week for16 weeks, while DT training group performed the same training with additional motor tasks. Data were gathered on 6 m timed walk (6MTW), timed up and go test (TUG) and four square step test (FSST). DT conditions required participants to complete 6MTW, TUG and FSST, either (i) while carrying a glass of water or (ii) while carrying a ball on a round tray. Results A significant Group x Time interaction was found in TUG (F [2,57] = 29.5; p < 0.01; partial η 2 = 0.51) and in FSST (F [2,57] = 23.2; p < 0.01; partial η 2 = 0.44). After intervention DT showed better scores in overall TUG (mean difference = 1.21 s [95% CI, 0.82–1.60]; p < 0.05) and FSST (mean difference = 2.51 s [95% CI, 1.67–3.35]; p < 0.01), whereas CG and ST did not exhibit significant changes. Conclusion Our results suggested that 16 weeks of motor DT training, using motor additional tasks as manipulation of common objects of everyday life, could improve mobility in older age.

Dual-task training in older adults: The effect of additional motor tasks on mobility performance

Brustio P. R.
;
2018

Abstract

Objectives Dual-task (DT) performance is common to most activities of daily living and difficulties in DT activities may reduce quality of life in older adults. This study investigated the effect of DT training in a sample of older adults. Methods Sixty older adults (mean = 74.4 ± 3.1 years) participated in the study. Twenty-two older adults were included in the control (CG), 19 in the single-task (ST) training and 19 in DT training group. ST group received balance and walking training twice a week for16 weeks, while DT training group performed the same training with additional motor tasks. Data were gathered on 6 m timed walk (6MTW), timed up and go test (TUG) and four square step test (FSST). DT conditions required participants to complete 6MTW, TUG and FSST, either (i) while carrying a glass of water or (ii) while carrying a ball on a round tray. Results A significant Group x Time interaction was found in TUG (F [2,57] = 29.5; p < 0.01; partial η 2 = 0.51) and in FSST (F [2,57] = 23.2; p < 0.01; partial η 2 = 0.44). After intervention DT showed better scores in overall TUG (mean difference = 1.21 s [95% CI, 0.82–1.60]; p < 0.05) and FSST (mean difference = 2.51 s [95% CI, 1.67–3.35]; p < 0.01), whereas CG and ST did not exhibit significant changes. Conclusion Our results suggested that 16 weeks of motor DT training, using motor additional tasks as manipulation of common objects of everyday life, could improve mobility in older age.
Geriatrics and Gerontology
Aging
Dual-task training
Mobility
Physical exercise
Health (social science)
Aging
Gerontology
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11562/1045589
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