To investigate how leg preference affects net efficiency (ηnet), we examined central and peripheral hemodynamics, muscle fiber type, activation and force of preferred (PL) and non-preferred (NPL) leg. Our hypothesis was that PL greater efficiency could be explained by adaptations and interactions between central, peripheral factors and force. Fifteen young participants performed single-leg extension exercise at absolute (35W) and relative (50%peak power-output (Wpeak)) workloads with PL and NPL. Oxygen uptake, photoplethysmography, Doppler ultrasound, near-infrared-spectroscopy deoxy-hemoglobin [HHb], integrated electromyography (iEMG), maximal isometric force (MVC), rate of force development (RFD50-100) and muscle biopsies of both vastus lateralis, were studied to assess central and peripheral determinants of ηnet. During exercise executed at 35W, ηnet was 17.5±5.1% and 11.9±2.1% (p<0.01) in NP and NPL respectively, while during exercise at the 50% of Wpeak, was in PL = 18.1±5.1% and in NPL = 12.5±1.9 (p<0.01). The only parameter correlated with ηnet was iEMG which showed an inverse correlation for absolute (r=-0.83 and -0.69 for PL and NPL) and relative workloads (r=-0.92 and -0.79 for PL and NPL). MVC and RFD50-100 were higher in PL than in NPL but not correlated to ηnet. This study identified a critical role of leg preference in the efficiency during single-leg extension exercise. The whole spectrum of the central and peripheral, circulatory and muscular determinants of ηnet did not explain the difference between PL and NPL efficiency. Therefore, the lower muscle activation exhibited by the PL is likely the primary determinant of this physiological phenomenon.

The effect of leg preference on mechanical efficiency during single-leg extension exercise

Venturelli, Massimo
;
Milanese, Chiara;Festa, Luca;Toniolo, Luana;Schena, Federico F
2021

Abstract

To investigate how leg preference affects net efficiency (ηnet), we examined central and peripheral hemodynamics, muscle fiber type, activation and force of preferred (PL) and non-preferred (NPL) leg. Our hypothesis was that PL greater efficiency could be explained by adaptations and interactions between central, peripheral factors and force. Fifteen young participants performed single-leg extension exercise at absolute (35W) and relative (50%peak power-output (Wpeak)) workloads with PL and NPL. Oxygen uptake, photoplethysmography, Doppler ultrasound, near-infrared-spectroscopy deoxy-hemoglobin [HHb], integrated electromyography (iEMG), maximal isometric force (MVC), rate of force development (RFD50-100) and muscle biopsies of both vastus lateralis, were studied to assess central and peripheral determinants of ηnet. During exercise executed at 35W, ηnet was 17.5±5.1% and 11.9±2.1% (p<0.01) in NP and NPL respectively, while during exercise at the 50% of Wpeak, was in PL = 18.1±5.1% and in NPL = 12.5±1.9 (p<0.01). The only parameter correlated with ηnet was iEMG which showed an inverse correlation for absolute (r=-0.83 and -0.69 for PL and NPL) and relative workloads (r=-0.92 and -0.79 for PL and NPL). MVC and RFD50-100 were higher in PL than in NPL but not correlated to ηnet. This study identified a critical role of leg preference in the efficiency during single-leg extension exercise. The whole spectrum of the central and peripheral, circulatory and muscular determinants of ηnet did not explain the difference between PL and NPL efficiency. Therefore, the lower muscle activation exhibited by the PL is likely the primary determinant of this physiological phenomenon.
dominance
fibre type
leg extension
muscle activation
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1045323
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