Purpose: To monitor elite youth female basketball training to verify whether players' and coaches' (3 technical coaches and 1 physical trainer) session rating of perceived exertion (s-RPE) has a relationship with Edwards' method. Methods: Heart rate of 15 elite youth female basketball players (age 16.7 [0.5] y, height 178 [9] cm, body mass 72 [9] kg, body mass index 22.9 [2.2] kg.m(-2)) was monitored during 19 team (268 individual) training sessions (102 [15] min). Mixed effect models were applied to evaluate whether s-RPE values were significantly (P <= .05) related to Edwards' data, total session duration, maximal intensity (session duration at 90-100% HRmax), type of training (ie, strength, conditioning, and technique), and whether differences emerged between players' and coaches' s-RPE values. Results: The results showed that there is a relationship between s-RPE and Edwards' methods for the players' RPE scores (P = .019) but not for those of the trainers. In addition, as expected, both players' (P = .014) and coaches' (P= .002) s-RPE scores were influenced by total session duration but not by maximal intensity and type of training. In addition, players' and coaches' s-RPE values differed (P < .001)-post hoc differences emerged for conditioning (P= .01) and technique (P < .001) sessions. Conclusions: Elite youth female basketball players are better able to quantify the internal training load of their sessions than their coaches, strengthening the validity of s-RPE as a tool to monitor training in team sports.

Player session rating of perceived exertion: a more valid tool than coaches' ratings to monitor internal training load in elite youth female basketball

Brustio P. R.
2020

Abstract

Purpose: To monitor elite youth female basketball training to verify whether players' and coaches' (3 technical coaches and 1 physical trainer) session rating of perceived exertion (s-RPE) has a relationship with Edwards' method. Methods: Heart rate of 15 elite youth female basketball players (age 16.7 [0.5] y, height 178 [9] cm, body mass 72 [9] kg, body mass index 22.9 [2.2] kg.m(-2)) was monitored during 19 team (268 individual) training sessions (102 [15] min). Mixed effect models were applied to evaluate whether s-RPE values were significantly (P <= .05) related to Edwards' data, total session duration, maximal intensity (session duration at 90-100% HRmax), type of training (ie, strength, conditioning, and technique), and whether differences emerged between players' and coaches' s-RPE values. Results: The results showed that there is a relationship between s-RPE and Edwards' methods for the players' RPE scores (P = .019) but not for those of the trainers. In addition, as expected, both players' (P = .014) and coaches' (P= .002) s-RPE scores were influenced by total session duration but not by maximal intensity and type of training. In addition, players' and coaches' s-RPE values differed (P < .001)-post hoc differences emerged for conditioning (P= .01) and technique (P < .001) sessions. Conclusions: Elite youth female basketball players are better able to quantify the internal training load of their sessions than their coaches, strengthening the validity of s-RPE as a tool to monitor training in team sports.
Edwards' method
heart rate
maximal intensity
team sports
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11562/1045112
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