Background: No study investigated the association between stress exposure in different stages of life and metabolic dysfunction.Aim: We explore the association between stress exposure and several biomarkers related to glucose metabolism (insulin, c-peptide, GIP, GLP-1, glucagon) in a group of 72 healthy individuals.Method: We used the Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse-Questionnaire (CECA-Q) and a modified version of the Life Events Scale to define exposure to stress, according to four categories: no exposure to childhood trauma (CT) nor to stressful life events (SLEs) (46%), only to CT (25%), only to SLEs (21%), to both (8%).Results: We found that c-peptide (p = 0.006) and insulin (p = 0.002) levels differed among the four categories: 0.77 ng/ml (SD 0.27) and 0.21 ng/ml (SD 0.06) for none, 0.77 (SD 0.37) and 0.20 (SD 0.08) for only SLEs, 0.88 (SD 0.39) and 0.27 (SD 0.12) for only CT, 1.33 (SD 0.57) and 0.40 (SD 0.28) for both, respectively. The highest levels of biomarkers were found in subjects exposed to both CT and SLEs.Conclusion: Our preliminary results seem to suggest that CT might be specifically associated with a dysfunction of glucose metabolism, which might increase the risk of poorer health outcomes in adulthood. This association seems to be even stronger in individuals additionally exposed to SLEs in adulthood. In conclusion, if confirmed in other studies, subjects exposed to both CT and SLEs appear the most vulnerable individuals, for whom preventative interventions, such as healthy lifestyle education programs, might ameliorate the risk of developing metabolic abnormalities.

Childhood and adulthood severe stressful experiences and biomarkers related to glucose metabolism: a possible association?

Tosato, Sarah
;
Bonetto, Chiara;Barcella, Mara;Ruggeri, Mirella;Tomassi, Simona;
2021

Abstract

Background: No study investigated the association between stress exposure in different stages of life and metabolic dysfunction.Aim: We explore the association between stress exposure and several biomarkers related to glucose metabolism (insulin, c-peptide, GIP, GLP-1, glucagon) in a group of 72 healthy individuals.Method: We used the Childhood Experience of Care and Abuse-Questionnaire (CECA-Q) and a modified version of the Life Events Scale to define exposure to stress, according to four categories: no exposure to childhood trauma (CT) nor to stressful life events (SLEs) (46%), only to CT (25%), only to SLEs (21%), to both (8%).Results: We found that c-peptide (p = 0.006) and insulin (p = 0.002) levels differed among the four categories: 0.77 ng/ml (SD 0.27) and 0.21 ng/ml (SD 0.06) for none, 0.77 (SD 0.37) and 0.20 (SD 0.08) for only SLEs, 0.88 (SD 0.39) and 0.27 (SD 0.12) for only CT, 1.33 (SD 0.57) and 0.40 (SD 0.28) for both, respectively. The highest levels of biomarkers were found in subjects exposed to both CT and SLEs.Conclusion: Our preliminary results seem to suggest that CT might be specifically associated with a dysfunction of glucose metabolism, which might increase the risk of poorer health outcomes in adulthood. This association seems to be even stronger in individuals additionally exposed to SLEs in adulthood. In conclusion, if confirmed in other studies, subjects exposed to both CT and SLEs appear the most vulnerable individuals, for whom preventative interventions, such as healthy lifestyle education programs, might ameliorate the risk of developing metabolic abnormalities.
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/11562/1044237
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