Objectives . Vocal fold paralysis can have a signifi cant impact on a patient ’ s quality of life. The aim of this study was to analyze, in terms of vocal improvement and motility recovery, the post-vocal treatment results of patients with unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVFP) who underwent early voice therapy. Study design. A 7 years prospective study of patients with an UVFP who underwent our multidimensional diagnostic-therapeutic assessment. Material and Methods.Seventy-four patients with UVFP were included in the study. All patients underwent a voice therapy based on forcible exercises supplemented by manipulations and maneuvers. A pre and post-treatment objective voice evaluation and self-assessment was made. Results: Out of 74 patients with UVFP, 51 (68.9%) recovered vocal fold motility. In 23 (31.1%), UVFP persisted after voice therapy. In this group of patients, a complete glottal closure was seen in 5 before voice therapy and in 13 after; An important and signifi cant (p 0.0001) reduction in fundamental frequency (F o) was found; a manifest improvement was seen for the mean values of Jitter (Jitt%; p 0.001), Shimmer (Shim%; p 0.0001) and noise-to-harmonic ratio (NHR) (p 0.0001). The same statistical comparisons calculated for male patients alone was not signifi cant for Jitt% (0.102), Shim% (0.112) and NHR (0.155), as a result of the reduced number of patients in this group. Voice Handicap Index (VHI) values showed a clear and signifi cant improvement and mean maximum phonation time (MPT) increased signifi cantly. Conclusion. Early voice therapy based on an energetic approach, combined with patient co-operation, motivation and understanding through educated participation in the voice restoration process, strengthen the idea that patients with UVFP have a good chance of recovering vocal fold motility or improving their voice quality.

The role of early voice therapy in the incidence of motility recovery in unilateral vocal fold paralysis

Molteni G;
2011-01-01

Abstract

Objectives . Vocal fold paralysis can have a signifi cant impact on a patient ’ s quality of life. The aim of this study was to analyze, in terms of vocal improvement and motility recovery, the post-vocal treatment results of patients with unilateral vocal fold paralysis (UVFP) who underwent early voice therapy. Study design. A 7 years prospective study of patients with an UVFP who underwent our multidimensional diagnostic-therapeutic assessment. Material and Methods.Seventy-four patients with UVFP were included in the study. All patients underwent a voice therapy based on forcible exercises supplemented by manipulations and maneuvers. A pre and post-treatment objective voice evaluation and self-assessment was made. Results: Out of 74 patients with UVFP, 51 (68.9%) recovered vocal fold motility. In 23 (31.1%), UVFP persisted after voice therapy. In this group of patients, a complete glottal closure was seen in 5 before voice therapy and in 13 after; An important and signifi cant (p 0.0001) reduction in fundamental frequency (F o) was found; a manifest improvement was seen for the mean values of Jitter (Jitt%; p 0.001), Shimmer (Shim%; p 0.0001) and noise-to-harmonic ratio (NHR) (p 0.0001). The same statistical comparisons calculated for male patients alone was not signifi cant for Jitt% (0.102), Shim% (0.112) and NHR (0.155), as a result of the reduced number of patients in this group. Voice Handicap Index (VHI) values showed a clear and signifi cant improvement and mean maximum phonation time (MPT) increased signifi cantly. Conclusion. Early voice therapy based on an energetic approach, combined with patient co-operation, motivation and understanding through educated participation in the voice restoration process, strengthen the idea that patients with UVFP have a good chance of recovering vocal fold motility or improving their voice quality.
Unilateral vocal fold paralysis, voice therapy, motility recovery, voice analysis, video-strobolaryngoscopic evaluation, thyroid-surgery
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1035818
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