Simple SummaryA diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in our therapeutic era should be implemented by the definition of the cell of origin, additional immunohistochemistry (i.e., BCL2 and MYC), and by fluorescent in-situ hybridization. The next step, suggested by the seminary works we will discuss in this review, will be to implement the definition of sub-categories by the recognition of single gene mutations and pathways that may be targetable by newer drugs. We here describe the impact that MYD88 and CD79B activating mutations, two of the most frequent mutations in several DLBCL subtypes, may achieve in the next future in the diagnosis and therapeutics of such a relevant lymphoma subtype.Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in adults. Despite the recognition of transcriptional subtypes with distinct functional characteristics, patient outcomes have not been substantially altered since the advent of chemoimmunotherapy (CIT) twenty years ago. Recently, a few pivotal studies added to the disease heterogeneity by describing several activating mutations, which have been associated with disease presentation, B-cell function and behavior, and final outcome. DLBCL arises from antigen exposed B-cells, with the B-cell receptor (BCR) playing a central role. BCR-activity related mutations, such as CD79B and MYD88, are responsible for chronic activation of the BCR in a substantial subset of patients. These mutations, often coexisting in the same patient, have been found in a substantial subset of patients with immune-privileged (IP) sites DLBCLs, and are drivers of lymphoma development conferring tissue-specific homing properties. Both mutations have been associated with disease behavior, including tumor response either to CIT or to BCR-targeted therapy. The recognition of CD79B and MYD88 mutations will contribute to the heterogeneity of the disease, both in recognizing the BCR as a potential therapeutic target and in providing genetic tools for personalized treatment.

Oncogenic Mutations of MYD88 and CD79B in Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Implications for Clinical Practice

Visco, Carlo
;
Tanasi, Ilaria;Quaglia, Francesca Maria;Ferrarini, Isacco;Fraenza, Costanza;Krampera, Mauro
2020-01-01

Abstract

Simple SummaryA diagnosis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma in our therapeutic era should be implemented by the definition of the cell of origin, additional immunohistochemistry (i.e., BCL2 and MYC), and by fluorescent in-situ hybridization. The next step, suggested by the seminary works we will discuss in this review, will be to implement the definition of sub-categories by the recognition of single gene mutations and pathways that may be targetable by newer drugs. We here describe the impact that MYD88 and CD79B activating mutations, two of the most frequent mutations in several DLBCL subtypes, may achieve in the next future in the diagnosis and therapeutics of such a relevant lymphoma subtype.Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in adults. Despite the recognition of transcriptional subtypes with distinct functional characteristics, patient outcomes have not been substantially altered since the advent of chemoimmunotherapy (CIT) twenty years ago. Recently, a few pivotal studies added to the disease heterogeneity by describing several activating mutations, which have been associated with disease presentation, B-cell function and behavior, and final outcome. DLBCL arises from antigen exposed B-cells, with the B-cell receptor (BCR) playing a central role. BCR-activity related mutations, such as CD79B and MYD88, are responsible for chronic activation of the BCR in a substantial subset of patients. These mutations, often coexisting in the same patient, have been found in a substantial subset of patients with immune-privileged (IP) sites DLBCLs, and are drivers of lymphoma development conferring tissue-specific homing properties. Both mutations have been associated with disease behavior, including tumor response either to CIT or to BCR-targeted therapy. The recognition of CD79B and MYD88 mutations will contribute to the heterogeneity of the disease, both in recognizing the BCR as a potential therapeutic target and in providing genetic tools for personalized treatment.
2020
CD79B mutations
MYD88 mutations
cell of origin
diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL)
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
Visco-Tanasi review MYD-88 Cancers manuscript.pdf

accesso aperto

Tipologia: Versione dell'editore
Licenza: Dominio pubblico
Dimensione 961.18 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
961.18 kB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1033121
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 15
  • Scopus 24
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 20
social impact