Ceftriaxone is an antibiotic agent frequently used in paediatric hospital practice for the treatment of severe bacterial infections. The use of this agent can result in cholelithiasis and/or biliary sludge, more commonly in children than in adults. This systematic review was aimed at analysing available literature concerning ceftriaxone-associated biliary pseudolithiasis in paediatric patients, with a special emphasis on the clinical aspects. A literature analysis was performed using Medline and Embase electronic databases (articles published in English up to December 2019), with the search terms and combinations as follows:'ceftriaxone', 'cholelithiasis', 'biliary sludge' 'gallstones' 'neonates' 'children' 'clinical aspects' 'management'. Several case reports, case series and prospective/retrospective studies have documented a relationship between ceftriaxone treatment and biliary pseudolithiasis in the paediatric population, even though literature data regarding neonates and infants are scarce. Ceftriaxone-associated biliary pseudolithiasis is dose-dependent and usually asymptomatic but, sometimes, it may present with abdominal pain, nausea and emesis. Abdominal ultrasonography should be performed when this complication is suspected. Generally, ceftriaxone-associated cholelithiasis resolves over a variable period of time (days to months) after cessation of therapy. Therefore, a conservative approach to this condition is advocated, but a prolonged follow-up may be necessary. A personalized assessment of factors predisposing to ceftriaxone-associated biliary pseudolithiasis before prescribing the drug can allow to minimize the risk of developing it, with significant advantages in terms of human and economic costs.

Ceftriaxone-associated biliary pseudolithiasis in children: do we know enough?

Cuzzolin, Laura
;
2021-01-01

Abstract

Ceftriaxone is an antibiotic agent frequently used in paediatric hospital practice for the treatment of severe bacterial infections. The use of this agent can result in cholelithiasis and/or biliary sludge, more commonly in children than in adults. This systematic review was aimed at analysing available literature concerning ceftriaxone-associated biliary pseudolithiasis in paediatric patients, with a special emphasis on the clinical aspects. A literature analysis was performed using Medline and Embase electronic databases (articles published in English up to December 2019), with the search terms and combinations as follows:'ceftriaxone', 'cholelithiasis', 'biliary sludge' 'gallstones' 'neonates' 'children' 'clinical aspects' 'management'. Several case reports, case series and prospective/retrospective studies have documented a relationship between ceftriaxone treatment and biliary pseudolithiasis in the paediatric population, even though literature data regarding neonates and infants are scarce. Ceftriaxone-associated biliary pseudolithiasis is dose-dependent and usually asymptomatic but, sometimes, it may present with abdominal pain, nausea and emesis. Abdominal ultrasonography should be performed when this complication is suspected. Generally, ceftriaxone-associated cholelithiasis resolves over a variable period of time (days to months) after cessation of therapy. Therefore, a conservative approach to this condition is advocated, but a prolonged follow-up may be necessary. A personalized assessment of factors predisposing to ceftriaxone-associated biliary pseudolithiasis before prescribing the drug can allow to minimize the risk of developing it, with significant advantages in terms of human and economic costs.
2021
biliary sludge; ceftriaxone; children; cholelithiasis; gallstones
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1032648
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