Background: Childhood obesity is becoming a major health issue and contributes to increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease in adulthood. Since dysregulated metabolism of bile acids (BAs) plays a role in progression of obesity-related disorders, including steatosis and hypertension, this study aimed to investigate BAs profiles in obese children with and without steatosis and hypertension, as well as exploring the interplay between BAs profile and vascular function. Methods: BAs concentrations were quantified with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in 69 overweight/obese children and adolescents (mean age, 11.6 ± 2.5 years; 30 females). Liver steatosis was defined with abdomen ultrasonography, whilst hypertension was defined according to the current European guidelines. Vascular function was assessed with ultrasound technique, by measuring carotid intima media thickness (cIMT) and common carotid artery distensibility (cDC). Results: Total and individual glycine-conjugated BAs concentrations were found to be significantly higher in males compared to females, as well as in pre-pubertal compared to pubertal stage (p < 0.05 for both). No difference in BAs concentration was observed between hypertensive and normotensive subjects. Total BAs and glycine conjugated BAs were significantly higher in participants with steatosis compared to those without (p = 0.004 for both). The values of total glycine-conjugate acids were positively correlated with cDC and this association remained significant in linear regression after adjusting for sex, age, pubertal stage, body mass index and aspartate aminotransferase. Conclusion: The results suggest a possible role of BAs in the pathogenesis of liver and/or vascular damage in children and adolescent. Further studies are hence needed to validate these preliminary findings.

Circulating Bile Acids Profiles in Obese Children and Adolescents: A Possible Role of Sex, Puberty and Liver Steatosis

Montagnana, Martina
;
Danese, Elisa;Giontella, Alice;Bonafini, Sara;Benati, Marco;Tagetti, Angela;Dalbeni, Andrea;Cavarzere, Paolo;Gaudino, Rossella;Pucci, Mairi;Salvagno, Gian Luca;Antoniazzi, Franco;Lippi, Giuseppe;Maffeis, Claudio;Fava, Cristiano
2020

Abstract

Background: Childhood obesity is becoming a major health issue and contributes to increasing the risk of cardiovascular disease in adulthood. Since dysregulated metabolism of bile acids (BAs) plays a role in progression of obesity-related disorders, including steatosis and hypertension, this study aimed to investigate BAs profiles in obese children with and without steatosis and hypertension, as well as exploring the interplay between BAs profile and vascular function. Methods: BAs concentrations were quantified with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry in 69 overweight/obese children and adolescents (mean age, 11.6 ± 2.5 years; 30 females). Liver steatosis was defined with abdomen ultrasonography, whilst hypertension was defined according to the current European guidelines. Vascular function was assessed with ultrasound technique, by measuring carotid intima media thickness (cIMT) and common carotid artery distensibility (cDC). Results: Total and individual glycine-conjugated BAs concentrations were found to be significantly higher in males compared to females, as well as in pre-pubertal compared to pubertal stage (p < 0.05 for both). No difference in BAs concentration was observed between hypertensive and normotensive subjects. Total BAs and glycine conjugated BAs were significantly higher in participants with steatosis compared to those without (p = 0.004 for both). The values of total glycine-conjugate acids were positively correlated with cDC and this association remained significant in linear regression after adjusting for sex, age, pubertal stage, body mass index and aspartate aminotransferase. Conclusion: The results suggest a possible role of BAs in the pathogenesis of liver and/or vascular damage in children and adolescent. Further studies are hence needed to validate these preliminary findings.
NAFLD, bile acids, children, endothelial function, hypertension, obesity, steatosis
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1030748
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