Objective This study aimed to determine whether multiple weight cycles in adulthood are an independent predictor of lower muscle mass and reduced strength, with potential implication for sarcopenia in adults with obesity. Methods A total of 60 males and 147 females with obesity were included, with a mean BMI of 37.9 +/- 6.0 kg/m(2) and a mean age of 52.6 +/- 12.4 years. Muscle strength was evaluated with handgrip and appendicular skeletal muscle mass was measured with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Results Participants were categorized into the following three groups: non-weight cyclers, mild weight cyclers, and severe weight cyclers. From a binary logistic regression that considered muscle mass categories as a dependent variable and weight cycling categories, age, and sex as independent variables, severe weight cyclers showed a 3.8-times increased risk of low muscle mass (95% CI: 1.42-10.01). Considering handgrip strength categories as a dependent variable and weight cycling categories, age, sex, and BMI as independent variables, severe weight cycling was associated with an increased risk of low muscle mass (about 6.3 times, 95% CI: 1.96-20.59). Severe weight cyclers showed a 5.2-times greater risk of developing sarcopenia. Conclusions In adults with obesity, weight cycling is associated with lower muscle mass and strength and a greater likelihood of developing sarcopenic obesity.

Weight Cycling as a Risk Factor for Low Muscle Mass and Strength in a Population of Males and Females with Obesity

Rossi, Andrea P;Rubele, Sofia;Caliari, Cesare;Pedelini, Francesco;Mazzali, Gloria;Dalle Grave, Riccardo;Zamboni, Mauro
2019-01-01

Abstract

Objective This study aimed to determine whether multiple weight cycles in adulthood are an independent predictor of lower muscle mass and reduced strength, with potential implication for sarcopenia in adults with obesity. Methods A total of 60 males and 147 females with obesity were included, with a mean BMI of 37.9 +/- 6.0 kg/m(2) and a mean age of 52.6 +/- 12.4 years. Muscle strength was evaluated with handgrip and appendicular skeletal muscle mass was measured with dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Results Participants were categorized into the following three groups: non-weight cyclers, mild weight cyclers, and severe weight cyclers. From a binary logistic regression that considered muscle mass categories as a dependent variable and weight cycling categories, age, and sex as independent variables, severe weight cyclers showed a 3.8-times increased risk of low muscle mass (95% CI: 1.42-10.01). Considering handgrip strength categories as a dependent variable and weight cycling categories, age, sex, and BMI as independent variables, severe weight cycling was associated with an increased risk of low muscle mass (about 6.3 times, 95% CI: 1.96-20.59). Severe weight cyclers showed a 5.2-times greater risk of developing sarcopenia. Conclusions In adults with obesity, weight cycling is associated with lower muscle mass and strength and a greater likelihood of developing sarcopenic obesity.
2019
Body Weight
Female
Hand Strength
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Muscle Strength
Muscle, Skeletal
Obesity
Risk Factors
Sarcopenia
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1029730
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