Background: Acute exercise leads to an immediate drop in blood pressure (BP), also called post-exercise hypotension (PEH). Exercise in hypoxia is related to additional vasodilation, potentially contributing to more profound PEH. Therefore, we investigated the impact of hypoxia versus normoxia on the magnitude of PEH. Second, we examined whether these changes in PEH relate to the BP-lowering effects of 12-week exercise training under hypoxia. Methods: In this prospective study, 21 healthy individuals (age 22.2 ± 3.0 years, 14 male) performed a 45-minute high-intensity running exercise on 2 different days in a random order, under hypoxia (fraction of inspired oxygen 14.5%) and normoxia (fraction of inspired oxygen 20.9%). BP was examined pre-exercise (t = 0) and at t = 15, t = 30, t = 45, and t = 60 minutes post-exercise. Afterward, subjects took part in a 12-week hypoxic running exercise training program. Resting BP was measured before and after the 12-week training program. Results: Acute exercise induced a significant decrease in systolic BP (systolic blood pressure [SBP], P = .001), but not in diastolic BP (diastolic blood pressure [DBP], P = .113). No significant differences were observed in post-exercise BP between hypoxic and normoxic conditions (SBP, P = .324 and DBP, P = .204). Post-exercise changes in SBP, DBP, and mean arterial pressure significantly correlated to the 12-week exercise training-induced changes in SBP (r = 0.557, P = .001), DBP (r = 0.615, P < .001), and mean arterial pressure (r = 0.458, P = .011). Conclusion: Our findings show that hypoxia does not alter the magnitude of PEH in healthy individuals, whilst PEH relates to the BP-lowering effects of exercise. These data highlight the strong link between acute and chronic changes in BP.

The acute and chronic effects of high-intensity exercise in hypoxia on blood pressure and post-exercise hypotension: A randomized cross-over trial

Fornasiero, Alessandro;
2020-01-01

Abstract

Background: Acute exercise leads to an immediate drop in blood pressure (BP), also called post-exercise hypotension (PEH). Exercise in hypoxia is related to additional vasodilation, potentially contributing to more profound PEH. Therefore, we investigated the impact of hypoxia versus normoxia on the magnitude of PEH. Second, we examined whether these changes in PEH relate to the BP-lowering effects of 12-week exercise training under hypoxia. Methods: In this prospective study, 21 healthy individuals (age 22.2 ± 3.0 years, 14 male) performed a 45-minute high-intensity running exercise on 2 different days in a random order, under hypoxia (fraction of inspired oxygen 14.5%) and normoxia (fraction of inspired oxygen 20.9%). BP was examined pre-exercise (t = 0) and at t = 15, t = 30, t = 45, and t = 60 minutes post-exercise. Afterward, subjects took part in a 12-week hypoxic running exercise training program. Resting BP was measured before and after the 12-week training program. Results: Acute exercise induced a significant decrease in systolic BP (systolic blood pressure [SBP], P = .001), but not in diastolic BP (diastolic blood pressure [DBP], P = .113). No significant differences were observed in post-exercise BP between hypoxic and normoxic conditions (SBP, P = .324 and DBP, P = .204). Post-exercise changes in SBP, DBP, and mean arterial pressure significantly correlated to the 12-week exercise training-induced changes in SBP (r = 0.557, P = .001), DBP (r = 0.615, P < .001), and mean arterial pressure (r = 0.458, P = .011). Conclusion: Our findings show that hypoxia does not alter the magnitude of PEH in healthy individuals, whilst PEH relates to the BP-lowering effects of exercise. These data highlight the strong link between acute and chronic changes in BP.
antihypertensive treatment
blood pressure
cardiovascular disease
exercise training
hypoxia
post-exercise hypotension
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1025934
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