Objective: To compare the effects of unilateral, proximal arm robot-assisted therapy combined with hand functional electrical stimulation with intensive conventional therapy for restoring arm function in survivors of subacute stroke.Design: This was a single-blinded, randomized controlled trial.Setting: Inpatient rehabilitation university hospital.Participants: Patients (N=40) diagnosed as having ischemic stroke (time since stroke <8wk) and upper limb impairment were enrolled.Interventions: Participants randomized to the experimental group received 30 sessions (5 sessions/wk) of robot-assisted arm therapy and hand functional electrical stimulation (RAT+FES). Participants randomized to the control group received a time-matched intensive conventional therapy.Main Outcome Measures: The primary outcome was arm motor recovery measured with the Fugl-Meyer Motor Assessment. Secondary outcomes included motor function, arm spasticity, and activities of daily living. Measurements were performed at baseline, after 3 weeks, at the end of treatment, and at 6-month follow-up. Presence of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) was also measured at baseline.Results: Both groups significantly improved all outcome measures except for spasticity without differences between groups. Patients with moderate impairment and presence of MEPs who underwent early rehabilitation (<30d post stroke) demonstrated the greatest clinical improvements.Conclusions: RAT+FES was no more effective than intensive conventional arm training. However, at the same level of arm impairment and corticospinal tract integrity, it induced a higher level of arm recovery. (C) 2019 by the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine

Effects of a Robot-Assisted Arm Training Plus Hand Functional Electrical Stimulation on Recovery After Stroke: A Randomized Clinical Trial

Mele, Sonia;
2019-01-01

Abstract

Objective: To compare the effects of unilateral, proximal arm robot-assisted therapy combined with hand functional electrical stimulation with intensive conventional therapy for restoring arm function in survivors of subacute stroke.Design: This was a single-blinded, randomized controlled trial.Setting: Inpatient rehabilitation university hospital.Participants: Patients (N=40) diagnosed as having ischemic stroke (time since stroke <8wk) and upper limb impairment were enrolled.Interventions: Participants randomized to the experimental group received 30 sessions (5 sessions/wk) of robot-assisted arm therapy and hand functional electrical stimulation (RAT+FES). Participants randomized to the control group received a time-matched intensive conventional therapy.Main Outcome Measures: The primary outcome was arm motor recovery measured with the Fugl-Meyer Motor Assessment. Secondary outcomes included motor function, arm spasticity, and activities of daily living. Measurements were performed at baseline, after 3 weeks, at the end of treatment, and at 6-month follow-up. Presence of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) was also measured at baseline.Results: Both groups significantly improved all outcome measures except for spasticity without differences between groups. Patients with moderate impairment and presence of MEPs who underwent early rehabilitation (<30d post stroke) demonstrated the greatest clinical improvements.Conclusions: RAT+FES was no more effective than intensive conventional arm training. However, at the same level of arm impairment and corticospinal tract integrity, it induced a higher level of arm recovery. (C) 2019 by the American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine
2019
Rehabilitation
Robotics
Stroke
Transcranial magnetic stimulation
Upper extremity
Activities of Daily Living
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1025138
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