The mechanisms of visuospatial attention are mediated by two distinct fronto-parietal networks: a bilateral dorsal network (DAN), involved in the voluntary orientation of visuospatial attention, and a ventral network (VAN), lateralized to the right hemisphere, involved in the reorienting of attention to unexpected, but relevant, stimuli. The present study consisted of two aims: 1) characterize the spatio-temporal dynamics of attention and 2) examine the predictive interactions between and within the two attention systems along with visual areas, by using fast optical imaging combined with Granger causality. Data were collected from young healthy participants performing a discrimination task in a Posner-like paradigm. Functional analyses revealed bilateral dorsal parietal (i.e. dorsal regions included in the DAN) and visual recruitment during orienting, highlighting a recursive predictive interplay between specific dorsal parietal regions and visual cortex. Moreover, we found that both attention networks are active during reorienting, together with visual cortex, highlighting a mutual interaction among dorsal and visual areas, which, in turn, predicts subsequent ventral activity. For attentional reorienting our findings indicate that dorsal and visual areas encode disengagement of attention from the attended location and trigger reorientation to the unexpected location. Ventral network activity could instead reflect post-perceptual maintenance of the internal model to generate and keep updated task-related expectations.

Spatiotemporal dynamics of attentional orienting and reorienting revealed by fast optical imaging in occipital and parietal cortices

Parisi, Giorgia;Mazzi, Chiara
;
Colombari, Elisabetta;Marzi, Carlo A;Savazzi, Silvia
2020-01-01

Abstract

The mechanisms of visuospatial attention are mediated by two distinct fronto-parietal networks: a bilateral dorsal network (DAN), involved in the voluntary orientation of visuospatial attention, and a ventral network (VAN), lateralized to the right hemisphere, involved in the reorienting of attention to unexpected, but relevant, stimuli. The present study consisted of two aims: 1) characterize the spatio-temporal dynamics of attention and 2) examine the predictive interactions between and within the two attention systems along with visual areas, by using fast optical imaging combined with Granger causality. Data were collected from young healthy participants performing a discrimination task in a Posner-like paradigm. Functional analyses revealed bilateral dorsal parietal (i.e. dorsal regions included in the DAN) and visual recruitment during orienting, highlighting a recursive predictive interplay between specific dorsal parietal regions and visual cortex. Moreover, we found that both attention networks are active during reorienting, together with visual cortex, highlighting a mutual interaction among dorsal and visual areas, which, in turn, predicts subsequent ventral activity. For attentional reorienting our findings indicate that dorsal and visual areas encode disengagement of attention from the attended location and trigger reorientation to the unexpected location. Ventral network activity could instead reflect post-perceptual maintenance of the internal model to generate and keep updated task-related expectations.
EROS
Granger causality
Optical imaging
Orienting
Reorienting
Visuospatial attention
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1023164
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