The purpose of this study is: (a) provide normative performance and anthropometric data of Southern European classic powerlifters of both sexes; (b) determine the possible relationships between these variables and performance; and (c) develop population-specific predictive equations for single lifts and overall powerlifting performance. During an unofficial national-level competition, we recruited 74 athletes (51 men and 23 women) and recorded their individual, anthropometric, and performance characteristics and divided them into sex and 2 performance categories based on their Wilks points. Weaker (<370 Wilks points) and stronger (>370 Wilks points) athletes of both sexes were compared by two-way analysis of variance. Simple correlation and multiple linear regression between individual/anthropometric characteristics and performance were modeled. We applied a step-forward multiple linear regression model to predict single lifts and overall performance. All parameters significantly differed between sexes (p < 0.05 for all comparisons). Stronger male athletes had a significantly larger neck (42 ± 2.8 cm; effect size [ES] = 0.59), and flexed (40.6 ± 3.3 cm; ES = 1.18) and relaxed upper-arm (37.5 ± 3.1 cm; ES = 1.34) and thigh girths (63.6 ± 7.0 cm; ES = 0.77) compared to weaker male athletes. Furthermore, stronger women had significantly larger flexed (32.6 ± 3.3 cm; ES = 0.88) and relaxed upper-arm (33 ± 1.5 cm; ES = 2.28) and chest girths (99.3 ± 9.2 cm; ES = 1.10) compared to weaker female athletes. A combination of experience, fat mass, and upper-limb and lower-limb muscle mass indexes can accurately and precisely predict overall and individual lift performance (r ≥ 0.83 for all the predictions). This is the first study to provide normative performance and anthropometric data in Southern European male and female powerlifters.

Performance and anthropometrics of classic powerlifters: which characteristics matter?

Colosio, Alessandro L;Teso, Massimo;Pogliaghi, Silvia
2022-01-01

Abstract

The purpose of this study is: (a) provide normative performance and anthropometric data of Southern European classic powerlifters of both sexes; (b) determine the possible relationships between these variables and performance; and (c) develop population-specific predictive equations for single lifts and overall powerlifting performance. During an unofficial national-level competition, we recruited 74 athletes (51 men and 23 women) and recorded their individual, anthropometric, and performance characteristics and divided them into sex and 2 performance categories based on their Wilks points. Weaker (<370 Wilks points) and stronger (>370 Wilks points) athletes of both sexes were compared by two-way analysis of variance. Simple correlation and multiple linear regression between individual/anthropometric characteristics and performance were modeled. We applied a step-forward multiple linear regression model to predict single lifts and overall performance. All parameters significantly differed between sexes (p < 0.05 for all comparisons). Stronger male athletes had a significantly larger neck (42 ± 2.8 cm; effect size [ES] = 0.59), and flexed (40.6 ± 3.3 cm; ES = 1.18) and relaxed upper-arm (37.5 ± 3.1 cm; ES = 1.34) and thigh girths (63.6 ± 7.0 cm; ES = 0.77) compared to weaker male athletes. Furthermore, stronger women had significantly larger flexed (32.6 ± 3.3 cm; ES = 0.88) and relaxed upper-arm (33 ± 1.5 cm; ES = 2.28) and chest girths (99.3 ± 9.2 cm; ES = 1.10) compared to weaker female athletes. A combination of experience, fat mass, and upper-limb and lower-limb muscle mass indexes can accurately and precisely predict overall and individual lift performance (r ≥ 0.83 for all the predictions). This is the first study to provide normative performance and anthropometric data in Southern European male and female powerlifters.
2022
anthropometry; male; female; powerlifting; strength
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1014512
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