OBJECTIVE: Literature shows that emotional status can influence participation in screening/surveillance programs, and that screening/surveillance programs may alter the psychological wellbeing of subjects examined. This study aims to assess if participating in a surveillance program for pancreatic cancer early detection is associated with abnormal levels of psychological distress in high-risk individuals, compared to the general population. METHODS: Fifty-four high-risk individuals (HRIs) participating in a Magnetic Resonance Cholangio-Pancreatography (MRCP)-based surveillance program completed several psychological assessment questionnaires, investigating global functioning, self-efficacy, perceived stress, coping abilities and social support. The questionnaires were administered by a clinical psychologist after the MRCP but before the subjects were informed about the results of the scans. The HRIs were subjects with strong familiarity of pancreatic cancer and/or carriers of known genetic mutations related to cancer susceptibility. The psychological assessment was made at the time of the first examination. RESULTS: The population was characterized by an overall good psychological status. Scoring of our sample was comparable to the general population norms. The HRIs showed decent global functioning, high self-efficacy levels, low perceived stress in the last month prior to examination, efficient emotion-focused coping strategies and an adequate social-support system. The younger subjects subpopulation only revealed higher levels of stress. CONCLUSIONS: From a psychological point of view, an MRCP-based pancreatic cancer annual surveillance seemed not to influence the HRIs' psychological wellbeing, unless in young people. Further studies are needed to better establish if there are any changes in distress levels over time and how emotional status influences participation in surveillance programs. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

The emotional impact of surveillance programs for pancreatic cancer on high-risk individuals: A prospective analysis

Paiella, Salvatore
;
Marinelli, Veronica;Secchettin, Erica;Mazzi, Maria Angela;Casolino, Raffaella;Bassi, Claudio;Salvia, Roberto
2020

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Literature shows that emotional status can influence participation in screening/surveillance programs, and that screening/surveillance programs may alter the psychological wellbeing of subjects examined. This study aims to assess if participating in a surveillance program for pancreatic cancer early detection is associated with abnormal levels of psychological distress in high-risk individuals, compared to the general population. METHODS: Fifty-four high-risk individuals (HRIs) participating in a Magnetic Resonance Cholangio-Pancreatography (MRCP)-based surveillance program completed several psychological assessment questionnaires, investigating global functioning, self-efficacy, perceived stress, coping abilities and social support. The questionnaires were administered by a clinical psychologist after the MRCP but before the subjects were informed about the results of the scans. The HRIs were subjects with strong familiarity of pancreatic cancer and/or carriers of known genetic mutations related to cancer susceptibility. The psychological assessment was made at the time of the first examination. RESULTS: The population was characterized by an overall good psychological status. Scoring of our sample was comparable to the general population norms. The HRIs showed decent global functioning, high self-efficacy levels, low perceived stress in the last month prior to examination, efficient emotion-focused coping strategies and an adequate social-support system. The younger subjects subpopulation only revealed higher levels of stress. CONCLUSIONS: From a psychological point of view, an MRCP-based pancreatic cancer annual surveillance seemed not to influence the HRIs' psychological wellbeing, unless in young people. Further studies are needed to better establish if there are any changes in distress levels over time and how emotional status influences participation in surveillance programs. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
cancer; cancer worries; coping strategies; emotional impact; high-risk individuals; oncology; pancreatic cancer; psychological burden; surveillance.
Cancer; Cancer worries; Coping strategies; Emotional impact; High-risk individuals; Oncology; Pancreatic cancer; Psychological burden; Surveillance
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1012450
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