BACKGROUND: The association between higher surgical volume and better perioperative outcomes after pancreatectomy has been extensively demonstrated. However, how different notions of experience impact outcomes of surgeons operating within high-quality scenarios remains unclear. METHODS: Self-reported experience parameters from ACS-NSQIP HPB-Collaborative surgeons were merged with 2014-2016 ACS-NSQIP clinical data. The association of various experience parameters with outcomes was investigated through uni- and multivariable analyses. Hierarchical regression assessed surgeon performance. RESULTS: 111/151 HPB-Collaborative surgeons provided responses (73.5%). Compared to the other 532 ACS-NSQIP surgeons performing pancreatectomy, HPB-Collaborative surgeons performed 7692/16,239 of the overall pancreatectomies (47.3%), with improved outcomes of serious morbidity, pancreatic fistula, reoperation, duration of stay and readmissions. Median age of respondents was 49 years and 92.8% were fellowship-trained. Median career and annual pancreatectomy volume were 400 and 35, respectively; median annual institutional volume was 100 resections. On unadjusted analyses, several aspects of experience were associated with the outcomes studied, especially for pancreatoduodenectomy; however, none remained significant after multivariable adjustment. Surgeons' profiling showed substantial homogeneity in performance for both pancreatoduodenectomy and distal pancreatectomy. CONCLUSIONS: Contemporary data shows that for surgeons operating in high quality settings clinical outcomes are largely independent of indicators of greater experience.

Assessing the influence of experience in pancreatic surgery: a risk-adjusted analysis using the American College of Surgeons NSQIP database

Maggino, Laura;
2019

Abstract

BACKGROUND: The association between higher surgical volume and better perioperative outcomes after pancreatectomy has been extensively demonstrated. However, how different notions of experience impact outcomes of surgeons operating within high-quality scenarios remains unclear. METHODS: Self-reported experience parameters from ACS-NSQIP HPB-Collaborative surgeons were merged with 2014-2016 ACS-NSQIP clinical data. The association of various experience parameters with outcomes was investigated through uni- and multivariable analyses. Hierarchical regression assessed surgeon performance. RESULTS: 111/151 HPB-Collaborative surgeons provided responses (73.5%). Compared to the other 532 ACS-NSQIP surgeons performing pancreatectomy, HPB-Collaborative surgeons performed 7692/16,239 of the overall pancreatectomies (47.3%), with improved outcomes of serious morbidity, pancreatic fistula, reoperation, duration of stay and readmissions. Median age of respondents was 49 years and 92.8% were fellowship-trained. Median career and annual pancreatectomy volume were 400 and 35, respectively; median annual institutional volume was 100 resections. On unadjusted analyses, several aspects of experience were associated with the outcomes studied, especially for pancreatoduodenectomy; however, none remained significant after multivariable adjustment. Surgeons' profiling showed substantial homogeneity in performance for both pancreatoduodenectomy and distal pancreatectomy. CONCLUSIONS: Contemporary data shows that for surgeons operating in high quality settings clinical outcomes are largely independent of indicators of greater experience.
experience; pancreatic surgery; outcomes
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1004940
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 0
  • Scopus 4
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 4
social impact