The cardiac mechanical function plays a critical role in governing and regulating its performance under both normal and pathological conditions. The left ventricle has historically received more attention in both congenital and acquired heart diseases and was considered as the mainstay of normal hemodynamics. However, over the past few decades, there has been increasing recognition of the pivotal role of the right ventricle in determining functional performance status and prognosis in multiple conditions. Nonetheless, the ventricles should not be considered separately as they share the septum, are encircled with common myocardial fibers and are surrounded by the pericardium. Thus, changes in the filling of one ventricle may alter the mechanical function of its counterpart. This ventricular interdependence remains even after the removal of the pericardium because of constrictive pericarditis or during open chest surgery. Interestingly, during open chest surgery, only the right ventricle mechanical activity is visually checked by the surgeon and cardiologist due to the absence of an intraoperative imaging technique able to evaluate its complex function. Noteworthy, most of the imaging techniques available to clinicians are established for the assessment of the left ventricle, with the ejection fraction being the most used parameter. However, this value is a measure of global systolic function which comes short in identifying regional myocardial impairment and the mechanical contraction. Therefore, new approaches are needed to deeply investigate the mechanics of both ventricles and correctly assess the cardiac mechanical performance. In this thesis, I studied the mechanical function of the left ventricle through different modalities of cardiac magnetic resonance and employed an innovative imaging technique for the assessment of the right ventricle mechanical function during open chest surgery.

Video Kinematic Evaluation: new insights on the cardiac mechanical function

Francesco Paolo Lo Muzio
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
2022-01-01

Abstract

The cardiac mechanical function plays a critical role in governing and regulating its performance under both normal and pathological conditions. The left ventricle has historically received more attention in both congenital and acquired heart diseases and was considered as the mainstay of normal hemodynamics. However, over the past few decades, there has been increasing recognition of the pivotal role of the right ventricle in determining functional performance status and prognosis in multiple conditions. Nonetheless, the ventricles should not be considered separately as they share the septum, are encircled with common myocardial fibers and are surrounded by the pericardium. Thus, changes in the filling of one ventricle may alter the mechanical function of its counterpart. This ventricular interdependence remains even after the removal of the pericardium because of constrictive pericarditis or during open chest surgery. Interestingly, during open chest surgery, only the right ventricle mechanical activity is visually checked by the surgeon and cardiologist due to the absence of an intraoperative imaging technique able to evaluate its complex function. Noteworthy, most of the imaging techniques available to clinicians are established for the assessment of the left ventricle, with the ejection fraction being the most used parameter. However, this value is a measure of global systolic function which comes short in identifying regional myocardial impairment and the mechanical contraction. Therefore, new approaches are needed to deeply investigate the mechanics of both ventricles and correctly assess the cardiac mechanical performance. In this thesis, I studied the mechanical function of the left ventricle through different modalities of cardiac magnetic resonance and employed an innovative imaging technique for the assessment of the right ventricle mechanical function during open chest surgery.
Cardiac Mecahnical Function, Congenital Cardiovascular Disease, Cardiac Video Kinematic
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1069146
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