Parent-child interactions play a central role in early developmental processes. One of the most important characteristics of these interactions, affecting both affiliative bonding and speech and language development, is the temporal coordination of the two partners or ‘synchrony’. Hearing loss is likely to affect this developing system. However, previous studies investigating synchrony of verbal behaviors in dyads of mothers with normal hearing and children with or without hearing loss report contrasting findings: while some studies report general differences between groups (e.g., Kondaurova et al., 2019), others show individual differences that are seemingly independent of the child’s ability to hear (e.g., Smith & McMurray, 2018). The present work is the first to our knowledge to investigate verbal synchrony between 40 mothers with normal hearing and their children with normal hearing (NHA; n=20) or with cochlear implants (CIs; n=20) one year after implantation (ages 1;1 - 3;11 years in both groups) in the Italian context. Mother-child interactions during semi-structured free-play were videorecorded for 20 minutes and transcribed. Vocalizations, overlapping speech, and between- and within-speaker pauses were manually coded for the first 10 children in each group using Praat (Boersma & Weenink, 2017) and are in the process of being coded for the remaining children. Preliminary data analysis on 10 children in each group showed no significant differences between groups in terms of mothers’ or children’s vocalizations, pauses, or overlapping speech (ps > .05). Within-group correlation tests showed positive, significant associations between the duration of maternal vocalizations and that of children’s vocalizations (r = 0.82, p = .004) and between the duration of non-interruptive overlapping speech in mothers and children (r = 0.77, p = .026) only in the NHA group. Tests also showed that the number of children’s contingent responses (operationalized as the number of responses given within 3 seconds from the end of the other speaker’s vocalization) was significantly correlated to the number of mothers’ contingent responses in both groups (NHA: r = 0.93, p < .001; CI: r = 0.95, p < .001). Results show absence of significant general differences between groups, but suggest tighter coupling between mothers’ and children’s verbal behaviors in interaction when children have normal hearing. Although mother-child interactions seem to be less synchronous when children have hearing loss, children with CIs appear to be sensitive to contingency timing and to attend to and to be partially tuning into the conversational dynamics of their mothers. Further analyses will help assess the validity of these results.

Synchrony between mothers and children with or without hearing loss: an Italian study.

Persici V.;Majorano M
2022

Abstract

Parent-child interactions play a central role in early developmental processes. One of the most important characteristics of these interactions, affecting both affiliative bonding and speech and language development, is the temporal coordination of the two partners or ‘synchrony’. Hearing loss is likely to affect this developing system. However, previous studies investigating synchrony of verbal behaviors in dyads of mothers with normal hearing and children with or without hearing loss report contrasting findings: while some studies report general differences between groups (e.g., Kondaurova et al., 2019), others show individual differences that are seemingly independent of the child’s ability to hear (e.g., Smith & McMurray, 2018). The present work is the first to our knowledge to investigate verbal synchrony between 40 mothers with normal hearing and their children with normal hearing (NHA; n=20) or with cochlear implants (CIs; n=20) one year after implantation (ages 1;1 - 3;11 years in both groups) in the Italian context. Mother-child interactions during semi-structured free-play were videorecorded for 20 minutes and transcribed. Vocalizations, overlapping speech, and between- and within-speaker pauses were manually coded for the first 10 children in each group using Praat (Boersma & Weenink, 2017) and are in the process of being coded for the remaining children. Preliminary data analysis on 10 children in each group showed no significant differences between groups in terms of mothers’ or children’s vocalizations, pauses, or overlapping speech (ps > .05). Within-group correlation tests showed positive, significant associations between the duration of maternal vocalizations and that of children’s vocalizations (r = 0.82, p = .004) and between the duration of non-interruptive overlapping speech in mothers and children (r = 0.77, p = .026) only in the NHA group. Tests also showed that the number of children’s contingent responses (operationalized as the number of responses given within 3 seconds from the end of the other speaker’s vocalization) was significantly correlated to the number of mothers’ contingent responses in both groups (NHA: r = 0.93, p < .001; CI: r = 0.95, p < .001). Results show absence of significant general differences between groups, but suggest tighter coupling between mothers’ and children’s verbal behaviors in interaction when children have normal hearing. Although mother-child interactions seem to be less synchronous when children have hearing loss, children with CIs appear to be sensitive to contingency timing and to attend to and to be partially tuning into the conversational dynamics of their mothers. Further analyses will help assess the validity of these results.
Synchrony
Parent-child interactions
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/11562/1064646
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